D. James Quinn

D. James Quinn writes science fiction and listens to late ’90s trip hop when he’s not wasting his time on the internet. At Stetson University, he studied contemporary poetry and weird fiction, and completed a Masters in Writing, Literature, and Publishing at Emerson College. His work has appeared in SPARK, Touchstone, and A Bad Penny Review. Quinn lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts with his fiancée and a grumble of imaginary pugs.

Work by D. James Quinn

D. James Quinn

The Pessoa Project

The poems you will find at The Pessoa Project are compiled at random by a machine language. This website dismantles and rebuilds the full text of Richard Zenith’s translation of The Book of Disquiet upon each viewing...

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D. James Quinn, Laura Oxendine

I WANT YOU NEED

Over the course of seven years, D.J. Quinn and Laura Oxendine have been collaborating on a range of projects in different media. I WANT YOU NEED reinforces their desire to color the space between visual media and everyday language. What began as a search for inspiration in the midst of corporate chaos grew into an ever-evolving yet intangible dialogue between writer and artist. I WANT YOU NEED, conducted remotely through email and existing solely in a digital space, attempts to integrate text with a visual context, questioning both the content and the shapes letters create.

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D. James Quinn

On Baptism

I am eight. I believe in dinosaurs. I love dinosaurs. Dinosaurs, like Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles or extraterrestrials, are huge bulging fantastic green creatures that can squash buildings, eat whole villages, and make a lot of noise. Dinosaurs are cool. Dinosaurs are so cool that I have to know everything there is to know about dinosaurs— all the different kinds, whether they are bipeds or quadrupeds, whether they are herbivores or carnivores, whether or not they had feathers, which ones fly, which geological timescale they come from and especially, when all these values are added up and considered, which dinosaur ...

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